Sunday, September 12, 2010

Blog Chain - What's Your Poison?

Margie started this round of the blog chain and she asks:

How did you come to write your YA genre (e.g. contemp, fantasy, etc.)? AND (yep, it’s a 2 parter), if you weren’t writing that, what genre would you be interested in exploring?

I've always loved stories with a fantastical twist. Even my favorite historical fiction is interwoven with rituals and ancient religions. I'm a fan of anything that involves sword-play, fighting, magic... My movie collection ranges from Lord of the Rings to Underworld, so urban fantasy was a no-brainer for me. But it wasn't until I graduated from writing paranormal into urban fantasy that I truly became a hard-core fan of the genre. The paranormal I'd been writing always had human MC's with extraordinary abilities. Sort of my twist on the super-hero. After I came up with the idea for my urban fantasy, I decided I'd better start reading up on the genre so I'd know how to write it. And since I started reading urban fantasy, I haven't stopped. Be it straight UF or with a romantic twist--I'll read it!

If I weren't writing UF and Paranormal, I think I'd write historical fiction. I would try to write an epic tale in the style of Bernard Cornwell, though I doubt I could live up to that standard! It's funny, but for me the research involved in writing historical fiction is more daunting than world-building for an entire race of mythical creatures!

Check out Kate's blog before mine and Sandra's tomorrow to find out what genre works best for them! Or you can start with Margie and work your way through the entire chain.

14 comments:

Sandra Ulbrich Almazan said...

I think fantasy and historical novels have the same effect of taking you out of the ordinary world. Perhaps that's why sometimes the two genres seem linked (besides the fact that many fantasties are set in different historical eras).

Christine Fonseca said...

Love the glimpse into your world, Amanda!

Michelle McLean said...

I love reading UF and Paranormal, and writing it too :D And you should give historical a chance one day - fun time ;-)

nomadshan said...

I Know what you mean about historical research vs. world-building. Neither set of facts is truly hard and fast, though, since both are informed by their author. Still, I hear you. I'll research my historicals into the ground so I don't make a dumb mistake. :)

Cole Gibsen said...

You know I'm down for anything with a superhero twist! :D

Susan R. Mills said...

I write contemporary, but I'd also like to try a historical. Maybe some day...

lbdiamond said...

Lovely post! Thanks for sharing your tastes and talents! :D

Eric said...

I completely agree with you about the effort needed to properly research historical fiction. This probably looks bad, but I have to go find out who Bernard Cornwell is. Yep, I'm un-edujumakated. If you ever do write historical fiction though, I'd love to read it. While I don't enjoy the idea of writing it, I love reading it.

Shawntelle Madison said...

I'd love to see an epic book from you! Would be awesome! But yeah, research can be all consuming! I would definitely be one of those authors spending more time with research than spending time working on the manuscript.

Kat Harris said...

For me, F/UF fall into the same category with scifi. I love a good scifi, fantasy or urban fantasy story, but I could never write one. I have a lot of respect for the people who can.

B.J. Anderson said...

I haven't watched Lord of the Rings in forever! I may have to have a marathon. :) Great post.

Margie Gelbwasser said...

I can't build fantasy worlds. I'll take research any day! Fantastic that you can!

Kate Karyus Quinn said...

I also started reading more urban fantasy novels after I started writing it - it really is a fun genre to read as well as write!

Shaun Hutchinson said...

I can't do the research for historical either. My brother got the history genes.